ALBUM REVIEW: La Symphonie-Thrash Du Professeur Juif Rebelle by The Gangsta Rabbi

the_gangsta_rabbi_cover_vii-660x4002x.jpg

http://www.gangstarabbi.com/

The Gangsta Rabbi, a.k.a. as The King of Jewish Punk, is the moniker of the multi-instrumentalist, singer/songwriter, composer and producer Steve Lieberman. He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a working class Jewish family and now resides in Freeport. Perhaps more than most artists, his work needs to be understood in the full context of his life.

He has been considered an ‘outsider artist’, partly attributed to his lifelong struggle with bipolar disorder which began for him at the age of just eleven. He has been releasing studio albums since 2002 and has now released over thirty, along with live albums and countless cassettes. He has shared the stage with Weezer, Andrew WK, Glassjaw, Ryan Dunn and The Misfits, but had to retire from performing in 2011 owing to having to battle an advanced form of leukaemia, returning briefly to the stage in 2016.

Last year, he was admitted into a hospice and remarkably has carried on creating, producing his most challenging works including completely covering Jethro Tull’s Thick As A Brick (a major influence) and thrash metal versions of the British Opera, The H.M.S. Pinafore and Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture.

This album, La Symphonie-Thrash Du Professeur Juif Rebelle, is his magnum opus, clocking in at thirty one tracks with a duration of over three hours. Apart from its remarkable length, it also sets a record for most instruments played in a symphony (eighteen!). The instruments involved cover a wide range including thrash guitar and basses, alto, tenor and bass trombones, flutes, trumpet, clarinet, euphonium and melodica as well as drums and percussion.

The first piece, L’espirit de Rebellion, sets out the album’s essential signature sound; a tsunami of sonic textures and frenetic drumming that borders on the chaotic and makes compelling listening from the outset. Although it teeters on the edge of musical chaos, it walks this tightrope effectively by retaining a melodic core throughout.
This basically fuses the essence of punk/metal spirit with the instrumental medium of classical music, and it results in abrasive yet consistently exhilarating soundscapes.

As with alternative rock bands like Sonic Youth and The Jesus & Mary Chain, who buried their melodies under layers of howling feedback, The Gangsta Rabbi’s music rewards repeated listening and this is the case with second track Mange Merde et Meurent (which translates as Eat Shit and Die!). It melds raw Stooges-style electric guitar with relentless thrash drumming and a dense wall of organic instrumentation with clarinet and trombones dominating the texture.

Third track, the amusingly titled Je Desire Une Basse Avec Un Whammy Bar, continues the riot with some rapid fire double kicks and some inventive Frank Zappa-style melodies and variations. Indeed, Zappa saw himself as a modern classical composer working in the idiom of rock music, and there are definite parallels here with Steve Lieberman. Like Zappa, Lieberman enjoys pushing the envelope, exploring the avant garde and juxtaposing unusual musical elements together.

La Carte de Recrue d’Aaron Judge and Hall’el Soixant-Trois both clock in at around eight minutes and continue the signature style with subtleties and details in the music that reward careful listening. As with his last album I reviewed, Lieberman’s work can be compared to the more challenging works of music by Don Van Vliet (Captain Beefheart) and the more outré offerings of Lou Reed. Beefheart’s album Trout Mask Replica sounds like a chaotic sprawl at first, then the order gradually reveals itself.

This tension between order and chaos, dissonance and melody and also the textural difference between raucous and soft is the fundamental dichotomy that lies at the heart of his music. These tracks notably feature his distorted lead vocals, and it’s no surprise that he approaches singing in a unique, idiosyncratic way, bringing to mind another avant garde rock artist, the late Mark E. Smith from the British group The Fall.

Le Jardin des Chiens is a ten minute epic that reaches a tumultuous climax, with some woodwinds seriously wailing against a piledriving musical backdrop. Woodwinds also dominate the following Holocauste, especially flute and clarinet and vocals emerge once again around the three minute mark. This piece flows seamlessly into Trois Petits Chiots, which almost feels like a sequel or companion piece with a similar theme.

Owing to the constraints of length, I can’t focus on every track but other highlights that stood out for me were Le Quartier Cancer #3 which is a sustained sonic hurricane that lasts nine minutes and which I perceived as an emotional expression of anger and rage at the struggle of being faced with leukaemia. This is followed by Le Professeur Juif est mort (The Gangsta Rabbi Is Dead), a title which certainly shows he has not lost his sense of humour, a testament to his fortitude and spirit.

The raging energy continues through to the end, with La Petite Jeunne Fille-Juife having one of the most distinctive melodies along with M.C.T.M.T. and the relentlessly frenetic but thrilling Mille-Neuf Cents Quatre-Vignts Et Neuf (which translates as 1989 but presumably has no link to the Taylor Swift album of the same name!) The superbly named Bonkey Sur D’an lives up to its title with a delightfully eccentric melodic theme that brings the woodwinds to the fore once again.

The final track La Chanson De Merde Vit (translating as The Shit Life Song) is a rampaging ten minute musical climax where it seems like all eighteen instruments are playing at once (probably the case). It feels like a defiant middle finger to the mortality we all share and it’s a glorious one.

Overall, this is a remarkable, challenging artistic work that blends thrash metal with avant garde classical to create music like nothing you’ve ever heard. It’s the sonic equivalent of standing in a wind tunnel for three hours. To have created such an epic musical tour de force in his dire health circumstances is an example of the power of the human spirit at its finest. Hopefully, The Gangsta Rabbi, a.k.a. Steve Lieberman, will get to be fully appreciated within his lifetime.

 

VERDICT =  8.4 out of 10

Alex Faulkner

Listen here:

Watch a video about the 18 instruments on the album:

 

 

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ALBUM REVIEW: A Cold Heaven by MadWolf

A Cold Heaven Album Art.png

https://song.link/album/s/1LJzedaYnv7MRC43a9MP3C

MadWolf is an upcoming composer/producer and multi-instrumentalist who creates music in an eclectic range of genres and styles, though his music could be loosely described as alternative and, at times, avant garde. He works with several creative collaborators, so in a certain sense MadWolf is essentially a collective.

Having also released a single this year, The Little Piano, this album consists of fourteen tracks and the collaborators include Ian Darr-Johnson, Nuetrino Yeatts, Vikiro Hop, Chase Naviello and Dylan ‘Cowboy’ Rose.

The first track Writing To My Reality features Nuetrino Yeatts delivering a spoken word poem over a background of classical-influenced piano. Whilst the moniker of Yeatts brings to mind the famous Irish poet, the poetry of this track is more akin to the stream of consciousness, introspective and freeform lyrical style of the Beat poets like Allen Ginsberg.

Musically, it is a composition of some skill in both how it is written and performed. Stylistically, it is closest to the era of Beethoven’s late piano sonatas and the combined effect is a mesmeric piece of avant garde along the lines of Revolution 9 by The Beatles.

Second track The Longest Dream is completely different; a ten minute alternative blues song featuring Ian Darr Johnson and Dylan ‘Cowboy’ Rose. Strummed acoustic guitar and occasional electric guitar are the bedrock of the sound, underpinned by subtle drumming and percussion.

The vocals are raw and passionately delivered, reaching anguished states at certain points. Lyrically, it is again poetic, with stark, affecting imagery that made me think of Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst: “Broken cities and broken men…..burning cities and burning men….”.

Gods and Stars maintains the rawness and slightly lo-fi nature of the previous song but is relatively lighter in tone. It is the first of several collaborations with Vikiro Hop. Whilst melodically upbeat, lyrically it’s riddled with angst and self-loathing: “I was the one who sucked the desert dry….I can see that this story is ending…”. The chorus hook is unexpectedly memorable and catchy, with the looseness of the performance belying a well crafted song and arrangement.

Broken Elevator is a solo MadWolf track, a two minute instrumental that made me think of the bleak electronic soundscapes of the second half of David Bowie’s classic Low album.  A fine track that showcases MadWolfs skills as a producer. The following Silver Forest is another song featuring Vikiro Hop, very different to the first. It’s electronica-tinged futuristic pop similar in style to that of another musical collective, Gorillaz.

Subconscious is a solo effort, one of the more avant garde songs that sounds like Dr. John jamming with a stoned Fleet Foxes, produced in the style of Tom Waits’ Swordfishtrombones album.

The inventive use of off-kilter percussion acts as a nice textural contrast to the finely played bluesy acoustic guitars. Seventh track Sticatto is another quirky instrumental featuring an irrepressibly upbeat staccato piano melody counterpointed by synth strings and brass.  Impossible to classify in terms of genre, but very enjoyable.

Float Back Down is an album highlight, a gentle, melancholy acoustic ballad with a poignant, world weary lead vocal (presumably by Vikiro Hop). This is MadWolf at his most traditional and accessible (even though the last words are ‘f*** them all’….).

Next comes a reprise of Broken Elevator, this one full of restless, hard to define rhythms and pleasingly distorted keyboards. Tenth track Bassoul is another curveball, a busy bassline and a jazzy vocal melody produced and arranged in a very unusual and interesting way. Perhaps the most original track on the album.

Simple Songs is a nice contrast; it’s a return to the more straightforward acoustic balladry of Float Back Down, this one augmented by magical, xylophone-style synth.  Twelve track Insane sounds like being in the studio at 3am after a few ‘jazz cigarettes’ and recording the results, including the amusing studio chatter. The song’s surreal start gives way to a more defined effort that has a Father John Misty vibe in its vocal melody.

Smooth Sailing introduces a new collaborator to the album, Chase Naviello.  It is one of the epics, a space-rock instrumental with reverb-drenched guitars beamed in from somewhere approaching Alpha Centauri. A deliciously blissed out track that seems to exist in it own unique sonic space, with a Dave Gilmour influence in the style of the playing.

The closing song Your Silence is another collaboration with Ian Darr-Johnson and it’s the sort of raw acoustic blues that Kurt Cobain was covering on Nirvana’s Unplugged in New York album.  The dissonant chord changes and angular vocal melody ensure the album ends on a predictably unpredictable way (if that makes sense).

Overall, this is a fascinatingly eclectic and diverse collection of songs by a composer/producer who seems to thrive on collaboration. Despite the wide range of genres and moods the album encompasses, there is still a cohesion to the music that is perhaps due to working with fellow creative kindred spirits.

There is a refreshing lack of pretension and commercial ambition in the rough hewn, ‘warts and all’ approach to the production, but those not put off by a lo-fi style will find a wealth of interesting material here.  I expect MadWolf to gain a devoted fanbase as a consequence of this fine album which puts blues, folk and electronica through the mangler and returns some intriguing, often enthralling, results.

VERDICT = 8.6 out of 10

 

Alex Faulkner

Listen here: 

ALBUM REVIEW: The Gangsta Rabbi’s Thrash Opus – Year 1812 Fest. Overture In EbMAJ by The Gangsta Rabbi

The_Gangsta_Rabbi_Cover_VII-660x400@2x

http://gangstarabbi.com/

The Gangsta Rabbi, a.k.a. as The King of Jewish Punk, is the moniker of the multi-instrumentalist, singer/songwriter, composer and producer Steve Lieberman. He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a working class Jewish family and now resides in Freeport. Perhaps more than most artists, his work needs to be understood in the full context of his life.

He has been considered an ‘outsider artist’, partly attributed to his lifelong struggle with bipolar disorder which began for him at the age of just eleven. He has been releasing studio albums since 2002 and has now released over thirty, along with live albums and countless cassettes. He has shared the stage with Weezer, Andrew WK, Glassjaw, Ryan Dunn and The Misfits, but had to retire from performing in 2011 owing to having to battle an advanced form of leukaemia, returning briefly to the stage in 2016.

He has been fighting the disease for the last seven years, which has had a pronounced effect on his artistic output. Every album has become progressively heavier to reflect the internal struggle of living with this terminal form of cancer. This year, he was admitted into a hospice and remarkably has carried on creating, producing his most challenging works including completely covering Jethro Tull’s Thick As A Brick (a major influence) and a thrash version of the British Opera, The H.M.S. Pinafore.

This work is based on Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture and preceding Opus numbers, with Lieberman playing every instrument himself. The instruments involved cover a wide range including thrash guitar and basses, alto, tenor and bass trombones, flutes, trumpet, clarinet, euphonium and melodica as well as drums and percussion.

The first track is a riotous sonic explosion from the very start. Dense layers of low-end distorted guitar and bass are augmented by double-kick drum patterns and frequent cymbals, proving the thrash element. A plethora of orchestral instruments create a fierce wall of sound, carrying the main melodic theme in unison or in octaves.

For the most part, the melody is submerged yet discernible amongst the onslaught of distortion and instrumental texture, yet towards the end we clearly hear the recognizable theme of the finale to the overture, an effective dynamic. The music is undeniably challenging, walking the tightrope between order and chaos in a way that reminded me of the more extreme and avant garde works of rock like Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music or Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart.

The following tracks maintain this essential approach, with Opus 44 – Russian Folk Song and Opus 45 – 2nd Solennelle pushing the envelope even further, the latter particularly manic yet strangely cohesive in its melodic dissonance; with less distortion it could pass for one of the more far out instrumentals of Frank Zappa, another outsider artist.

It is also apt in a sense that Lieberman has chosen to reinterpret Tchaikovsky in this way. The great Russian composer was also a rather tortured person who struggled all his life with emotional turmoil and depression. For Tchaikovsky, composing and performing music was a cathartic emotional release which reflects in the intensity of his music, and this intensity is magnified exponentially in the hands of Lieberman.

The Battle of Borodino stands out for the stridency of the low end brass that has just as much bite as the wall of guitars and 3rd Solennelle continues in the same vein. Theme Aus Overture somehow finds another gear, giving the music a sense of fierce momentum and climax, with the theme from the finale emerging through the howling storm of sound.

The finale, Battalion Closer/Fanfare is an epic fifteen minutes that ramps up the relentless intensity to immense proportions. The drone of the guitars sounds like a jet taking off and the recognizable theme of the finale emerges at the same point as the first track. This time, it expands into another nine minutes of anarchic dissonance melded with melody, which goes through countless permutations before the two main themselves combine in a kind of tumultuous fugato.

Overall, this is an uncompromising and completely unique artistic reinterpretation of a well known classical work that is visceral yet compelling. The Gangsta Rabbi has forged a musical style entirely of his own, one rooted in his own life experiences and unique approach to music making. The fusion of thrash and classical is not one I’ve ever encountered and this will be appreciated by aficionados of the avant garde, in particular. It goes without saying that to have created and recorded this in a hospice with advanced leukaemia is a heroic feat in itself.

 

VERDICT =  7.8 out of 10

Alex Faulkner

 

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ALBUM REVIEW: Involution by Martin Del Carpio

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https://martindelcarpio.bandcamp.com/album/involution

Martin Del Carpio is an experimental electronica artist hailing from New York. His music is a unique hybrid of electronica, avant garde, spoken word and musique concrete, as well as occasional songs which he performs lead vocals on himself. Previous releases include 2011’s X album, followed by Goddard in 2013. A retrospective compilation called Lost Illusions was released in 2014, while 2015 saw the release of an experimental music project called Notes From The Underground.

This album, Involution, is a ten-track concept album that was strongly influenced by the passing of his mother and the spiritual/existential questions it raised. Fundamental to understanding the album is Carpio’s belief that we are essentially spirits, forms of energy that survive the death of our physical body, which is reflected in the music. After the short, poignant intro the hard-hitting industrial electronica of Dolphox seizes the attention.

Phosphorus is an instrumental that has a mystical, otherworldly aspect, achieved partly through skilled use of reverb. Gradually a beat emerges, with a haunting piano melody repeated till the end, which creates cumulative power. Alma is perhaps the centrepiece of the album, featuring a spoken word monologue that asks the deepest existential questions of the human condition: “What is behind the stars? What dark invincible sphere lies there?“. It’s an extremely powerful and thought provoking piece of art.

Camera Obscura continues the spiritual theme, recanting a Christian prayer in a whisper over an evocative, mysterious soundscape. Say A Prayer then surprises the listener with sung vocals for the first time. The moving lyrics are about feeling a spiritual connection regardless of belief: “Say a prayer in your heart, even if it doesn’t make sense…”.

Witchery is an unsettling but inventive piece of electronica, reminiscent of the claustrophobic intensity of Massive Attack. This is contrasted perfectly by the hymn-like purity of November (Black Rose). It’s a heartbreaking elegy for his mother, sung beautifully. The lyrics manage to be both dark and uplifting at the same time: “Oh black rose will you sing? For the heart beats no more…”.

The following I Only Want You To Love Me (Letter to the Father) is another spoken word instrumental that is brave and unflinching in exploring the difficult emotions that follow the passing of a loved one. The final song Ashes is, again, a very affecting and beautiful piece of music. It consists of just an a capella vocal, lyrically a sort of spiritual mantra that celebrates his mother’s passing as part of nature’s cycle of life: “I give these ashes back to the earth, to nourish lands and skies above.…”.

Overall, this a unique artistic expression of dealing with grief and the soul searching questions that experience raises. It’s a difficult and emotive subject handled with great sensitivity and emotional honesty, much to his credit. He has developed a musical oeuvre that is very individual, and the eclectic nature of the music is held together cohesively by the central theme of the album. It’s essentially a work of art that will move anyone who hears it and challenges the listener as all good art should do.

VERDICT: 9 out of 10

Alex Faulkner

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